Voice 
Solutions

Which solution ?

There are so many terms floating out there, Hosted, VOIP, SIP, On-Premise, and more that it can become very confusing. We can help you navigate through to find a solution that works for you.  We offer a hosted solution through ACO and an onsite solution from NEC. We also work with other platforms such as Nextiva, Panasonic, IP Office, and 8x8 to name a few. 

Hosted
(Cloud-Based)

 A hosted phone system requires a good internet connection as all calls are received and made through the internet. It works through your computer network. A hosted system is easily expandable and can offer more options to communicate with customers and staff.  Your staff can easily work remotely using a hosted system. Capital expense is lower since there is no hardware to purchase other than desk phones which are optional.  You can opt to have a desk phone but can also use an app on your cell phone and your computer/laptop. System updates are done automatically and require no onsite visits. The only downfall is the monthly fee for the subscription as each endpoint, user, requires a connection to the hosted system.

Onsite

 An onsite phone system can use incoming analog copper lines, or sip lines, through the internet, to receive and make calls. The system can do utilize both as well. There is a greater upfront cost when building the system but options can be added later. Depending on the need of the customer, analog, digital, and VOIP phones can be utilized. Analog and digital handsets require a direct connection to the phone system creating additional cabling needs. VOIP handsets utilize the computer network to make a connection to the phone system there potentially reducing cabling needs.  The onsite system requires software to be loaded onto a PC to manage and make changes to the system. With an onsite system, you can have more extensions, handsets, than you do incoming telephone lines. 

The drawbacks of the system are that it can require onsite visits, extended warranty costs, spare parts, and the eventuality of the system going end-of-life.